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List of national parks of Indonesia

National parks are areas for conservation purposes often in the form of natural, semi-natural and advanced nature reserves that are managed or owned by the state. Each country sets their national parks differently, but generally includes wild conservation for posterity and national symbols.

National parks are one type of conservation area because they are protected by the state from human development and pollution. The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) and the World Commission on Protected Areas (WCPA) designate national parks as protected areas in Category II.

Dlium List of national parks of Indonesia

Indonesia regulates national parks in Law Number 5 of 1990 concerning Conservation of Natural Resources and Ecosystems where national parks are defined as natural conservation areas that have original ecosystems, managed with zoning systems used for research, science, education, cultural support purposes, tourism and recreation.

At present there are 53 national parks in Indonesia managed by the Ministry of Forestry of the Republic of Indonesia. The following is a list of Indonesian national parks:



National Parks (year of declaration, sq Km, sq mi, Marine area), international status.

BALI
  • Bali Barat (1995, 190, 73)

JAVA
  • Alas Purwo (1992, 434, 168)
  • Baluran (1980, 250, 96)
  • Karimunjawa Island (1986, 1,116, 431, most)
  • Mount Bromo Tengger Semeru (1983, 503, 194), World Network of Biosphere Reserves
  • Mount Ciremai (2004, 155, 60)
  • Mount Gede Pangrango (1980, 150, 58), World Network of Biosphere Reserves
  • Mount Halimun Salak (1992, 400, 150)
  • Mount Merapi (2004, 64, 25)
  • Mount Merbabu (2004, 57, 21)
  • Meru Betiri (1982, 580, 224)
  • Seribu Island (1982, 1,080, 420, most)
  • Ujung Kulon (1992, 1,206, 466, 443 sq km), World Heritage Site

KALIMANTAN
  • Betung Kerihun (1995, 8,000, 3,100), Proposed World Heritage Site
  • Bukit Baka Bukit Raya (1992, 1,811, 699)
  • Kayan Mentarang (1996, 13,605, 5,252)
  • Kutai (1982, 1,986, 767)
  • Lake Sentarum (1999, 1,320, 510), Ramsar site
  • Mount Palung (1990, 900, 350)
  • Sabangau (2004, 5,687, 2,196)
  • Tanjung Putting (1982, 4,150, 1,370), World Network of Biosphere Reserves

MALUKU
  • Aketajawe-Lolobata (2004, 1,673, 646)
  • Manusela (1982, 1,890, 729)

NUSA TENGGARA
  • Kelimutu (1992, 50, 20)
  • Komodo Island (1980, 1,817, 701, 66%), World Heritage Site, World Network of Biosphere Reserves
  • Laiwangi Wanggameti (1998, 470, 180)
  • Manupeu Tanah Daru (1998, 880, 340)
  • Mount Rinjani (1990, 413, 159)
  • Mount Tambora (2015, 716, 276)

PAPUA
  • Cenderawasih Bay (2002, 14,535, 5,611, 90%)
  • Lorentz (1997, 25,050, 9,670), World Heritage Site
  • Wasur (1990, 4,138, 1598), Ramsar site

SULAWESI
  • Bantimurung - Bulusaraung (2004, 480, 185)
  • Bogani Nani Wartabone (1991, 2,871, 1,108)
  • Bunaken Island (1991, 890, 342, 97%), Proposed World Heritage Site
  • Gandang Dewata (2016, 793, 306)
  • Lore Lindu (1982, 2,290, 884), World Network of Biosphere Reserves
  • Rawa Aopa Watumohai (1989, 1,052, 406), Ramsar site
  • Taka Bone Rate Coral Reef (2001, 5,308, 2,049, most), World Network of Biosphere Reserves, Proposed World Heritage Site
  • Togean Island (2004, 3,620, 1,400, 700 sq km)
  • Wakatobi Island (2002, 13,900, 5,370, most), World Network of Biosphere Reserves, Proposed World Heritage Site

SUMATERA
  • Batang Gadis (2004, 1,080, 417)
  • Berbak (1992, 1,628, 628), Ramsar site
  • Bukit Barisan Selatan (1982, 3,650, 1410), World Heritage Site
  • Bukit Duabelas (2000, 605, 233)
  • Bukit Tigapuluh (1995, 1,277, 493)
  • Mount Leuser (1980, 7,927, 3,061), World Heritage Site, World Network of Biosphere Reserves
  • Mount Kerinci Seblat (1999, 13,750, 5,310), World Heritage Site
  • Sembilang (2001, 2,051, 792), Ramsar site
  • Siberut (1992, 1,905, 735), World Network of Biosphere Reserves
  • Tesso Nilo (2004, 386, 149)
  • Way Kambas (1989, 1,300, 500)
  • Zamrud (2016, 314)

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