Skip to main content

Beta-cyclocitral makes tomato and rice roots grow faster and branch more

Scientists have identified the beta-cyclocitral hormone that makes tomato and rice roots grow faster and branch more. Molecules as fertilizer also have an underground role in helping to grow roots faster.

Scientists report findings in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences where the addition of beta-cyclocitral molecules to the soil will accelerate the growth of the roots of rice and tomatoes. Rice plants are also resistant to salty soil.

Dlium Beta-cyclocitral makes tomato and rice roots grow faster and branch more

"For centuries, more attention has been paid to leaves and other properties that are easily visible. Because roots are hidden underground and have been neglected," said Philip Benfey of Duke University in Durham.

Benfey and colleagues in previous studies have suggested that some molecules that are chemically linked to carotenoids, pigments that give orange carrots, may be important. But the researchers are not sure exactly which.

Many of these carotenoid relatives have been rearranged and are commercially available as food additives or supplements. Alexandra Dickinson from Duke University tested Arabidopsis by adding each compound to the gel to make it clear where the roots grew and monitor what happened for 10 days.

"Beta-cyclocitral stands out," Dickinson said.

Roots grow faster and also branch more and the same effect occurs in rice and tomatoes. Rice plants can also live in salty soil. Untreated rice plants are very unhappy with the level of salt, but the addition of beta-cyclocitral makes the plants undisturbed.

It is likely that the compound helps the roots push down through salty soil layers to reach deeper and less salty soils. The researchers hope that beta-cyclocitral can be added to the soil or sprayed onto plants and encourage root growth in wider plants.

Journal : Alexandra J. Dickinson et al. β-Cyclocitral is a conserved root growth regulator, PNAS, May 8, 2019, DOI:10.1073/pnas.1821445116

Comments

Popular

Indian rosewood (Dalbergia latifolia)

Sonokeling or Java palisandre or Indian rosewood ( Dalbergia latifolia ) is a species of plant in the Fabaceae, a large tree producing hardwood, medium weight and high quality, rounded leaves, thin and broad pods, highly adaptive, grows in dry and rocky landscapes with lots of sunlight. D. latifolia has medium to large size, cylindrical stems, up to 40 m high with a ring of up to 2 m, the bark is brownish gray and slightly cracked longitudinally. The crown is dense, dome-shaped and sheds leaves. The leaves are compound and pinnate oddly with 5-7 strands that have different sizes and appear alternately on the shaft. The leaves are round or elongated in width or heart, the upper surface is green and the surface is pale green. The flowers are small, 0.5-1 cm long and clustered in panicles. The pods are green to brown when ripe and are elongated lanceolate, pointed at the base and tip. The pods have 1-4 seeds which are soft and brownish. Indian rosewood grows at elevations below 600 m,

Lawe (Abroma augustum)

Lawe or devil's cotton ( Abroma augustum ) is a plant species in Malvaceae, a small tree or bush that is erect, up to 10 m tall but generally 2-3 m tall, stems and twigs covered with star hair that are sharp, brittle and cause skin itching, sometimes also with glandular hair. A. augustum has a single leaf, alternating, has a long stalk, a heart-shaped base, a pointed tip with a very variable base whose leaves near the base of the branch have a circular shape from the egg to the heart, 3-5 curves, diameter 20-37 cm, while the leaves near the tips of twigs have elongated shapes with smooth toothed edges. The flowers gather in cymes at the tips of the twigs or face leaves, 1-4 buds, 1-3 cm long stems and 6-8 mm bractea. Hanging flowers, 3-5 cm in diameter, 5 angles and 1-3.5 cm long stems. The petals have 5 leaves, share a deep, triangular, 15-20 mm long, 6 mm wide and greenish. The crown has 5 leaves, spoon-shaped, 2-3.5 cm long, 1 cm wide, dark purple or red or yellow, concave an

Redflower ragleaf (Crassocephalum crepidioides)

Sintrong or ebolo or thickhead or redflower ragleaf ( Crassocephalum crepidioides ) are plant species in Asteraceae, terma height 25-100 cm, white fibrous roots, generally grow wild on the roadside, yard gardens or abandoned lands at altitude 200- 2500 m. C. crepidioides has erect or horizontal stems along the soil surface, vascular, soft, non-woody, shallow grooves, green, rough surface and short white hair, aromatic fragrance when squeezed. Petiole is spread on stems, tubular and eared. Single leaf, spread out, green, 8-20 cm long, 3-6 cm wide, longitudinal or round inverted eggshell with a narrow base along the stalk. Pointed tip, flat-edged or curved to pinnate, jagged rough and pointed. The top leaves are smaller and often sit. Compound flowers grow throughout the year in humps that are arranged in terminal flat panicles and androgynous. Green cuffs with orange-brown to brick-red tips, cylindrical for 13-16 mm long and 5-6 mm wide. The crown is yellow with a brownish red