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Golden bamboo (Bambusa vulgaris)

Bambu Kuning or big yellow bamboo or green-stripe common bamboo or golden bamboo (Bambusa vulgaris) is a subspecies in Poaceae, yellow stems with green vertical stripes and widely used as ornamental plants, yard boundaries, furniture materials and traditional medicine ingredients.

B. vulgaris grows clumpy but not too tight and the sympodial branching rhizome. The buds are yellow or green, covered by brown or black feathers. Reed upright to a height of 10-20 m, straight or slightly shaky and curved end. Start branching after 1.5 m above the ground, having 2 to 5 branches in one book but only one large.

Dlium Golden bamboo (Bambusa vulgaris vittata)

The length of the section is around 20-45 cm and the center line is about 4-10 cm, the wall thickness of the reed is around 7-15 mm, yellow with green lines, the feathers are attached and have a layer of white wax when young. Reed midribs fall out quickly, triangular, 15-45x20 cm wide, longer and green but eventually turn yellow. The outer side is covered by black moles and hairy edges.

The reed midrib leaves are erect, wide triangular, have a size of 4-5x5-6 cm, narrow at the base and pop up at the ends, haired on both sides and along the bottom edge. The midrib ear is relatively large, oval-shaped and stretches out, 0.5-2 cm long with pale brown fur, a slightly jagged ligula with a height of 3 mm.

Big yellow bamboo have leaves on lancet-shaped twigs and about 6-30x1-4 cm. Small and rounded midrib ears, 0.5-1.5 mm high with 1-3 mm long bristle hair. Ligula is almost flat, about 0.5-1.5 mm high and locus.

Inflorescence in the form of panicles and usually on twigs or reeds that are not leafy or in small leaf reeds with small groups of spikelet in each bud and separated by a distance of 2-6 cm. Spikelet is a narrow ovoid, 12-19x4-5 mm in size, flattened on the sides, consisting of 5-10 perfect florets and one tip floret.



Bambu kuning in Southeast Asia grows a lot in villages, on the banks of rivers, on the edge of roads, abandoned areas, open spaces and in urban areas as ornamental plants. This species likes the hot and humid lowlands, grows to an altitude of 1,200 m above sea level, but tends to dwarf above 1,000 m above sea level.

Golden bamboo can also grow in very dry seasonal places even though it is often molested. This bamboo is used to fulfill a variety of needs including the mast, steering wheel, buttress, house poles, even though the rod is not so straight and cannot bear the beetle attack.

B. vulgaris has several subspecies including Green-stripe Common Bamboo (Bambusa vulgaris ssp. Vittata), Buddha Bamboo (Bambusa vulgaris ssp. Wamin), Bambusa vulgaris var. aureovariegata, Bambusa vulgaris var. constrichnoda and Bambusa vulgaris ssp. vulgaris.

This tree is also used to make traditional combs and koteka in Papua. Green-stripe common bamboo is well known in the furniture and reed industries for pulp which is good for making paper. The shoots are eaten as vegetables in Java and boiled water is also used to treat hepatitis.

Kingdom: Plantae
Clade: Angiosperms
Clade: Monocots
Clade: Commelinids
Order: Poales
Family: Poaceae
Genus: Bambusa
Species: B. vulgaris
Subspecies: Bambusa vulgaris vittata, Bambusa vulgaris wamin, Bambusa vulgaris aureovariegata, Bambusa vulgaris constrichnoda, Bambusa vulgaris vulgaris

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